Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Temporary Modular Housing

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4410 Kaslo Street Across from 29th Avenue SkyTrain Station

 
On Friday 1 December 2017 news came out that City of Vancouver looks to place “temporary modular housing” on the site of a community garden that lies just to the north of the Norquay area of East Vancouver. The three-storey structure(s) would contain “approximately 50 single-occupancy homes” and “be in place for up to five years, with the possibility to extend another five years” (notification sheet image below).

        Community Information Sessions
        4 pm to 7 pm  •  Wednesday 13 December 2017
        4 pm to 7 pm  •  Thursday 14 December 2017
        First Hungarian Presbyterian Church, 2791 East 27th Avenue

 

 
     Vancouver Courier/Dan Toulgoet Photo of 4410 Kaslo Street
 

 
Norquay and Then Not Norquay

This Kaslo Street site fell within the boundaries of Norquay for the first 3½ years of planning — from the outset in March 2006 until an abrupt cut-off, announced by then Director of Planning Brent Toderian to Norquay Working Group on 2 November 2009. City planners informed Norquay in writing on 30 Jan 2010:

        Input received through the Norquay Village planning process
        will be included in the [future] station area planning phase.

        (Open House Panel 3 — Station Area Planning in Norquay)

The Housing Vancouver Strategy adopted by City Council on 29 November 2017 sets the highest priority on launching “station area planning” early in 2018 for both the 29th Avenue and Nanaimo SkyTrain stations.

In July 2017 Cheryl Chan reported that City of Vancouver had hopes of seeing 600 modular units “scattered across the city at up to 15 under-used or vacant sites pending development.” As of early December 2017, the City of Vancouver web site identifies 7 locations: 220 Terminal Avenue, 650 West 57th Avenue, 1115 Franklin Street, 1131 Franklin Street, 1141 Franklin Street, 501 Powell Street, 4410 Kaslo Street. A mapping of those locations shows a dramatic skew in geographic distribution so far:

 

 
     Seven Vancouver Temporary Modular Housing Sites as of 3 Dec 2017
 

 
Poor Doors Escalate to Poor Areas

With 7 of perhaps 15 sites now designated for temporary modular housing, the process may have reached a half-way mark for the current round. The current “scatter” of temporary modular housing shows a distinct socioeconomic pattern. This particular new City of Vancouver “planning” effort apparently seeks to go citywide with the poor-door philosophy of shunning social mix. Planners have planned for, and Council or staff have approved, that same poor-door philosophy in controversial condo development projects like these:

•  Strathcona Village at 955 East Hastings — 18 September 2012 Public Hearing

•  The Jervis at 1171 Jervis Street — 4 May 2015 Development Permit Board

•  1068-1080 Burnaby Street and 1318 Thurlow Street — 22 November 2017 Open House

 
In other words, just as certain condo residents are expected to enter through a lower-class doorway, certain Vancouver residents are expected to find their housing in a lower-class neighbourhood. If this is how the city wants things to be, then specific property surtax should be levied on local areas that fail to shoulder their load in helping to house the homeless.

In September 2017 Jean Swanson, by-election candidate for City Council, and first runner-up in the election voting, said this to Global News:

        Six hundred units a year, for three years, that’s only 1,800.
        We already have 2,138 homeless people, so it’s not enough.

 

 

 
     Notification Sheet from City of Vancouver
 
 



 
 
Resources:

Eye on Norquay will continue to add to selected citations listed below. Ordering is reverse chronological, with newest at top. Last update: 14 December 2017

 
City of Vancouver Materials

 
City of Vancouver Web Site for Temporary Modular Housing  (ongoing)
http://vancouver.ca/people-programs/temporary-modular-housing.aspx

Operations Management Plan — Draft  (undated)
Temporary Modular Housing at 500-650 West 57th Avenue
http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/operations-management-plan-temporary-modular-housing-7430-and-7460-heather-street.pdf

Norquay School News — Advertisement  (December 2017)
http://go.vsb.bc.ca/schools/norquay/Publications/December%202017%20Newsletter.pdf

Council Agenda: 7. TEXT AMENDMENTS: Amendments to Official Development Plans to Add Temporary Modular Housing as a Permitted Use  (6 Dec 2017)
Council Agenda: 8. TEXT AMENDMENT: Amendments to the Regional Context Statement Official Development Plan By-law To Facilitate the Development of Temporary Modular Housing  (6 Dec 2017)
http://council.vancouver.ca/20171206/phea20171206ag.htm

City of Vancouver News: 4410 Kaslo Street planned as next site for temporary modular housing  (1 Dec 2017)
http://vancouver.ca/news-calendar/4410-kaslo-street-planned-as-next-site-for-temporary-modular-housing.aspx

Council Report: Amendments to Official Development Plans to Add Temporary Modular Housing as a Permitted Use  (14 Nov 2017)
http://council.vancouver.ca/20171114/documents/p10.pdf

Council Report: Temporary Modular Housing Contract Approval  (4 Oct 2017)
http://council.vancouver.ca/20171004/documents/pspc2.pdf

Council Agenda: Item 1. Presentation – Housing Vancouver Update – Part II – Addressing Vancouver’s Lower Income and Homeless Residents  (26 July 2017)
http://council.vancouver.ca/20170726/documents/pspc1-Presentation.pdf

Council Report: Zoning and Development By-law No. 3575 – Amendment to the General Regulations to Delegate Discretionary Relaxation Powers to Expedite the Delivery of Low Cost Housing for Persons Receiving Assistance  (26 July 2017)
http://council.vancouver.ca/20170726/documents/pspc-UrgentBusiness1.pdf

Memorandum: Staffing Update – Housing Policy Group to move to Planning, Urban Design and Sustainability  (30 Mar 2017)
http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/2017-03-30-staffing-update-housing-policy-group-to-move-to-planning-urban-design-sustainability.pdf

Council Agenda: Item 2. Temporary Modular Housing Definition And Regulations: Proposed Amendments To Existing City-Owned Cd-1 Sites, And Design Guidelines  (13 Dec 2016)
Includes: Policy Report, Staff Presentation, Summary and Recommendation, and Memorandum
http://council.vancouver.ca/20161213/phea20161213ag.htm

 
Kaslo / 29th Avenue SkyTrain Site

Penny Daflos / Kendra Mangione. Security present at meeting on homeless housing.
CTV News Vancouver (14 Dec 2017)
https://bc.ctvnews.ca/security-present-at-meeting-on-homeless-housing-1.3722017

Saša Lakić. Collingwood residents want more info on modular housing. Vancouver Courier (14 Dec 2017)
http://www.vancourier.com/news/collingwood-residents-want-more-info-on-modular-housing-1.23123169

Nadia Stewart. Kaslo modular housing fight (video). Global News (8 Dec 2017)
https://globalnews.ca/video/3906973/kaslo-modular-housing-fight

Charlie Smith. City and B.C. Housing to host open houses before creating modular housing on Powell, Franklin, and Kaslo streets. Georgia Straight (3 Dec 2017)
https://www.straight.com/news/1003406/city-and-bc-housing-host-open-houses-creating-modular-housing-powell-franklin-and-kaslo

Mike Howell. City identifies another site for homeless housing in Vancouver. Vancouver Courier (1 Dec 2017)
http://www.vancourier.com/news/city-identifies-another-site-for-homeless-housing-in-vancouver-1.23110397

 
Poor Doors

Jen St. Denis. City planners to review separate entrances for social housing units. Vancouver Metro (4 Dec 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/12/04/city-to-look-at-poor-doors.html

Jon Azpiri. ‘Poor doors’ and ‘poor playgrounds’: Vancouver development criticized for divisions between condos, social housing. Global News (27 Nov 2017)
https://globalnews.ca/news/3884276/poor-doors-and-poor-playgrounds-vancouver-development-criticized-for-divisions-between-condos-social-housing/

Jen St. Denis. West End condo would not only have “poor door,” but poor playground. Vancouver Metro (23 Nov 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/11/23/west-end-condo-would-not-only-have-poor-door-but-poor-playground.html

Naibh O’Connor. Vancouver housing activist slams ‘poor doors.’ Vancouver Courier (6 May 2015)
http://www.vancourier.com/news/vancouver-housing-activist-slams-poor-doors-1.1926603

Andrea Woo. Vancouver developer accused of using ‘poor door’ for low-income residents. Globe and Mail (5 May 2015)
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/vancouver-developer-accused-of-using-poor-door-for-low-income-residents/article24272511/

 
Marpole Site

Jessica Kerr. Marpole residents ask for judicial review of modular housing. Vancouver Courier (8 Dec 2017)
http://www.vancourier.com/news/marpole-residents-ask-for-judicial-review-of-modular-housing-1.23117645

Ashifa Kassam. Vancouver protesters ordered to stop blocking homeless housing project. Guardian (6 Dec 2017)
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/06/vancouver-canada-homeless-project-protest-court

Ana Rose Walkey. B.C. Supreme Court orders end to Vancouver modular-housing protest. Globe and Mail (5 Dec 2017)
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/bc-supreme-court-orders-end-to-vancouver-housing-protest/article37219138/

Dan Fumano / Patrick Johnston. Marpole modular housing permit receives conditional approval. Vancouver Sun (27 Nov 2017)
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/marpole-temporary-modular-housing-development-permit-receives-conditional-approval

Travis Lupick. Modular housing for low-income residents approved for Marpole despite neighbourhood opposition. Georgia Straight (27 Nov 2017)
https://www.straight.com/news/1000686/modular-housing-low-income-residents-approved-marpole-despite-neighbourhood-opposition

Jen St. Denis. Marpole students speak up in support of housing for homeless. Vancouver Metro (15 Nov 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/11/15/marpole-students-speak-up-in-support-of-housing-for-homeless.html

Jen St. Denis. Marpole site chosen for Vancouver’s second modular housing. Vancouver Metro (26 Oct 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/10/26/marpole-site-for-vancouver-s-second-modular-housing.html

 
General and Other

Saša Lakić. Modular housing projects provide ‘a place to call home.’ Vancouver Courier (8 Dec 2017)
http://www.vancourier.com/news/modular-housing-projects-provide-a-place-to-call-home-1.23117683

Dan Fumano. With more modular housing coming, city looks to learn from Marpole backlash. Vancouver Sun (14 Nov 2017)
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/dan-fumano-despite-opposition-in-kerrisdale-and-marpole-expect-more-housing-action-from-city-hall

Jean Swanson. Tax the rich with a Mansion Tax. Georgia Straight (6 Oct 2017)
https://www.straight.com/news/977946/jean-swanson-tax-rich-mansion-tax

Stephanie Ip. Vancouver city council awards contract to build 600 modular homes. Vancouver Sun (5 Oct 2017)
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/vancouver-city-council-awards-contract-to-build-600-modular-homes

Jesse Ferreras / Nadia Stewart. 40 modular housing units. 600 more coming. Still not enough for Vancouver’s homeless: critics. Global News (20 Sept 2017)
https://globalnews.ca/news/3760320/modular-housing-vancouver/

Cheryl Chan. Vancouver wants more modular housing built to help homeless. Vancouver Sun (26 July 2017)
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/vancouver-wants-more-modular-housing-built-to-help-homeless

Carlito Pablo. City of Vancouver aims for more temporary modular housing to take in poor people. Georgia Straight (26 July 2017)
https://www.straight.com/news/940976/city-vancouver-aims-more-temporary-modular-housing-take-poor-people

Jen St. Denis. Vancouver’s modular housing not as inexpensive as it seems, argues real estate broker. Vancouver Metro (9 Jan 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/01/09/vancouver-modular-housing-not-as-cheap-as-it-looks.html

Jean Swanson. Unpacking government claims about homelessness. Georgia Straight (20 June 2016)
https://www.straight.com/news/721261/jean-swanson-unpacking-government-claims-about-homelessness

 

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Written by eyeonnorquay

9 December 2017 at 11:53 am

Safeway at Broadway/Commercial

 
Pre-Application Open House

Tuesday, 27 June 2017
Croatian Cultural Centre, 3250 Commercial Drive

Doors: 5:30 pm
Presentation: 6:00 pm
Open House: 6:15 pm to 8:30 pm

http://www.broadwaycommercial.ca/app/uploads/2017/06/1594-Broadway-Commercial-June-27-OH-Flyer.pdf

 
The Broadway/Commercial Safeway (as well as the Safeway at 3410 Kingsway) are where many residents of Norquay go for their food shopping. The Norquay Plan has already seen developer Westbank plunder the plaza that was supposed to serve local residents on the 2220 Kingsway former Canadian Tire site Instead, we got a podium fortress with a parklet designed to serve underground air exhaust vents. Now Westbank seeks to eliminate a another plaza, a key element of the 2016 Grandview-Woodland Plan on the Safeway site at 1780 East Broadway. Come out to the June 27 event and tell Westbank’s consultants what you think.

The Broadway/Commercial Safeway site falls within the boundaries of Cedar Cottage, the Vancouver neighbourhood already heavily impacted by the two “neighbourhood centres” of Kingsway & Knight and Norquay Village. Though extreme for extent and multiplicity, the planning for Cedar Cottage has been anything but comprehensive. Flagrant abuse of the geographic center has been followed by grab-bag snatches at the perimeter: Norquay, 3365 Commercial, and now the Safeway site.

Also see Alternative Location Proposed for New Commercial Drive Public Plaza.

 

 

 

 
 

Written by eyeonnorquay

21 June 2017 at 11:14 am

Posted in Events, News

2751 Kingsway / Harvey’s

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Pre-Application Open House on 21 June 2017

 

 

 
A pre-application open house to present a development proposal for 2751 Kingsway (the Harvey’s site) will be held 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm on 21 June 2017 at Cunningham School (2330 East 37th Avenue). A building of 10 storeys on Kingsway and 4 storeys on Duke Street is proposed. This is consistent with the Norquay plan.

The pre-application open house is the first step in community consultation for a rezoning proposal. Although only residents living very near the site receive official notification, the even is open to all.

Suggestions for changes to development proposals have greatest effect at this first public stage of the process. Come to the open house and submit written comments.
 

Written by eyeonnorquay

15 June 2017 at 9:48 am

Posted in Events, News

More Affordable?

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In essence, the 2010 Norquay Plan intended for accelerated replacement of the most affordable existing older housing to provide opportunities for developers to sell brand-new units to a different demographic. The City of Vancouver refused to carry out a social impact analysis for the local area as part of the planning.

 

 

The following price data for new housing types in the Norquay area was assembled on 19 March 2017, and reflects observations collected from Multiple Listing Service during the first quarter of 2017.
 

 
Duplex

     2737 Duke St           $1,128,000     1271 sq.ft.     Resale (3 yrs old)

     4672 Clarendon St      $1,248,000     1647 sq.ft.     New

     2466/2468 E 37th Ave   $1,338,000     1462 sq.ft.     New

     5678/5680 Rhodes St    $1,388,800     1873 sq.ft.     New

 

 
Small House

Both of these are infill houses on large lots in the RT-11 zone, separated from the main duplex and from the laneway house by 8 ft. Only two developments have been built with this configuration, and neither infill house has sold after more than a year on the market.

     2355 E 41st Ave         $973,000      1548 sq.ft.     New

     5512 Dundee St          $825,000      1330 sq.ft.     New

 

 
Stacked Townhouse

     4575 Slocan St           $869,000     1271 sq.ft.     New

     5184-2601 E 37th Ave     $858,000     1274 sq.ft.     Presale

     5188-2601 E 37th Ave     $588,000      841 sq.ft.     Presale

     5186-2601 E 37th Ave     $488,000      649 sq.ft.     Presale

 

 
Laneway House

     2470 E 37th Ave          $745,000      802 sq.ft.     New

 
 

Written by eyeonnorquay

1 April 2017 at 11:55 am

Posted in News, Price Data

Repeat Offender

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Westbank Jet-Engines Again at 2220 Kingsway

 
The following posting includes an update to the Sleepless posting of a week ago.

On Sunday afternoon 5 March 2017 Westbank at 2220 Kingsway once again operates a large jet-engine-noisy propane heater on the twelfth-floor of the east tower that is now under construction. The noise is audible through closed windows from over 400 feet away. There is an ordinary house right across the lane from the disturbance.

 
img_1121-648
 

This abuse occurs only two days after the responsible district building inspector telephoned to say that this kind of outside-allowable-hours construction noise should not occur again. She reported that she had conferred with a “certified professional” for the project. Professional what? Apologist who effects no compliance? It now seems obvious that Westbank has no respect for construction noise regulations, or for the neighborhood that it seeks to extract value from.

 
img_1123-648
 

On a mid-afternoon site inspection to confirm the source of the noise, this stash of about twenty large propane bottles was observed. Is this legitimate storage? Should this quantity of propane be in this location? Could there be a massive explosion? Westbank does not seem to care about that either.
 

Written by eyeonnorquay

5 March 2017 at 3:57 pm

Posted in 2220 Kingsway, News

Failing City

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Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson stirred up local media with a 1 March 2017 annual keynote address to the Urban Land Institute.

If you had coughed up $125 in good time, you could have gone to the Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront to hear Robertson’s latest wild stabs at gaining favor with the perceived voter. But if you weren’t a developer, you probably didn’t show up at that expensive scene.

Ordinary tax-paying residents are left to sift through skimpy news accounts to try to get a handle on this “preview of new directions the city is planning to take to produce housing for people, not investments.” That just-quoted gist comes from the caption to the story in Metro, a news source which has recently zoomed to the top of the heap for content and reliability.

Three points jump out from that Jen St. Denis coverage on the day of the speech:

     •  Find ways to increase density on lots without land assembly
     •  Attempt to encourage new housing that people will live in — not hold as
         under-occupied investments
     •  Encourage duplexes to multiply into four-plexes

What follows is a seasoned Norquay take on these febrile brain waves. In case you forgot, Norquay was mass-rezoned in 2010 to achieve some of these goals. Singled out. “Planned.” And promised alleviating amenity that shows almost no signs of ever being delivered in the lifetime of existing residents.

First and foremost, why would Robertson jump off in so many directions at once without making any attempt to assess the current state of the Norquay experiment? Our ADHD mayor hotfoots from homelessness to civic logos to EcoDensity™ cubed. Confidence wanes that he has any clue about what he is doing, other than scrambling to front for whatever he is advised to front for. A weird style of “leadership.”

 
Without Land Assembly

The Norquay mass rezoning set off a speculative wave of land assembly that is still reverberating. At one early stage Klein Group was hawking most of the south side of Duke Street between Duchess and Earles. Robertson imagines he can somehow rezone without rezoning?

One especially nasty early experiment at 2298 Galt Street demonstrated that “four-storey apartment” without land assembly was not a good idea. Planners subsequently recognized that fact in the zoning for RM-9A.

 
New Housing that People Will Live In

Here is a recent photo of 4565/4571/4585 Slocan Street, three sixplexes built under conditional RM-7 zoning as stacked townhouse.

 
img_1110-648
 

On multiple recent occasions we have observed this new housing being marketed without advertised open house to sizeable groups of what are almost certainly offshore investors. These smaller investors may feel forced to rent the units to cover mortgage, thus sacrificing the purity of newness. But who can tell?

 
Double Duplex = Fourplex … On One Lot

The duplex form in Norquay has seen considerable take-up by developers. A new duplex, strata-titled on half the land, is not much cheaper than an existing fee simple house (not so new) on a whole lot. So duplex has not brought the promised new level of affordability. Besides that, as expected, rapid redevelopment has rushed the extermination of older more affordable housing, obliterating what would have been a more organic cycle. If the failed experiment at 2298 Galt is what Robertson means by “four-plex,” start to shudder.

On a less polemic note, Eye on Norquay has undertaken monitoring reviews of two new housing types, Duplex and Small House/Duplex. We know what we’re talking about.

Gregor Robertson is proposing to make a bold move on all of Vancouver — okay, probably never Shaughnessy and certain other special areas, because essential inequities must be maintained — a bold move based on an absolute jumble of notions. Perhaps he and his “planners” should start with a good stare at Norquay in the rearview mirror? But that is not where you can imagine a bright future, like you can when doing ninety miles an hour down a dead-end street.

Never forget the bottom line, whatever emits from Robertson’s mouth. The perennial task is to open up vast new tracts of already built-on Vancouver land for ever-increasing developer profits. And to do that in a tricky fashion, so the new lift value accrues mainly to the developer, not to the current property owner.
 

 
News Accounts

Frances Bula. The signs of a ‘failing city.’ Globe and mail BC ed (2 Mar 2017) S1-S2

Mike Howell. Housing options coming to single-family neighbourhoods. Vancouver courier (2 Mar 2017)
http://www.vancourier.com/news/housing-options-coming-to-single-family-neighbourhoods-1.10786757

Matte Robinson. Robertson takes frank tone on housing crisis. Vancouver sun (2 Mar 2017) A3

Jen St. Denis. Emptying neighbourhoods sign of ‘failing city’: Vancouver mayor. Metro (1 Mar 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/03/01/emptying-neighbourhoods-sign-of-failing-city-.html

Jen St. Denis. Can Vancouver avoid empty neighbourhood ‘death’ with gentle density? Metro (2 Mar 2017)
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/03/02/can-vancouver-avoid-empty-neighbourhood-with-gentle-density.html
 

Written by eyeonnorquay

3 March 2017 at 11:21 pm

Posted in Context, News

Sleepless

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More Abuse from Westbank at 2220 Kingsway

 
img_1049-648
 
     View of Westbank’s 2220 Kingsway: Looking West along East 30th Avenue
 

On Friday 24 February Eye on Norquay received an email about new overnight construction noise at Westbank’s 2220 Kingsway construction site. Three fourteen-storey towers are being built on top of a podium that covers most of the 2.3 acres. An on-site observation at 9:45 pm, standing in front of the house at 2220 East 30th Avenue, confirmed a continuous, loud, low-pitched noise emanating from the south tower, which now stands at four of fourteen storeys.

 
img_1051-648
 
     Looking East Down East 30th Avenue
 

According to the email, this noise started on the preceding night of 23/24 February. The writer of the email attributes the noise to a large propane heater, and states: “My whole family cannot sleep at all because of this.”

The City of Vancouver’s Noise Control By-Law No. 6555

        http://former.vancouver.ca/bylaws/6555c.PDF

addresses such construction noise in sections 15 and 16 and 17. Section 15 limits continuous sound level to 85 decibels. (On occasions during the daytime, the site emits continuous noise that can be heard three blocks away.) Section 16 limits construction noise to weekdays from 7:30 am to 8:00 pm and 10:00 am to 8:00 pm on Saturday, with quiet for Sunday and holidays. Section 17 provides for relaxations.

 
img_1048-648
 
     The Noisiest Spot: Standing at Curbside of 2220 East 30th
 

This particular noise may exceed the allowed sound level. In any case, the noise is not allowed between 8:00 pm and 7:30 am. It seems unlikely that relaxation has been granted, and if so, this information has not been communicated to adjacent residents.

It would appear that the use of a large noisy propane heater serves only the purpose of reducing construction time. If the temperature is too low to pour, then the developer should wait for acceptable conditions. Speeding up the profits should not justify the continuous overnight impact on local area residents who already are having to put up with an incredible amount of noise, dirt, and traffic to accommodate the construction of these buildings.

The foregoing concern is being forwarded to relevant City of Vancouver authorities by Eye on Norquay. If and when a response is received, it will be appended to this posting.
 

•     •     •     •     •     •     •

 
Update Monday Feb 27 AM

 
Sat 25 Feb AM –
Account of situation posted to Eye on Norquay, together with tweet-out (including @westbankcorp) and four helpful retweets

Sat 25 Feb Evening –
Detailed email of complaint to City of Vancouver Noise By-Law Enforcement with cc to three senior city administrators

Sun 26 Midday –
Affected resident reported end of noise

Mon 27 AM –
Two separate conversations with City of Vancouver staff. Case file established. Confirmation that 2220 Kingsway site had no formal exception to permit emission of continuous loud noise over period extending for 2-3 days. Request that any resumption of this continuous noise during allowed construction hours be checked for permissible decibel level.

The More That Followed

For district building inspector report back of 3 March 2017, followed by repeat offence two days later, see Repeat Offender.
 

Written by eyeonnorquay

25 February 2017 at 11:13 am

Posted in 2220 Kingsway, News